英语听力 学英语,练听力,上听力课堂! 注册 登录
> 在线听力 > 有声读物 > 世界名著 > 简爱 >  第1课

简爱CHAPTER I

所属教程:简爱

浏览:

随身学
扫描二维码方便学习和分享
http://www.viz2016.com/lesson/shi0529/0001/1582/01_2223675.mp3
http://www.viz2016.com/statics/js/2012

CHAPTER I  

THERE was no possibility of taking a walk that day. We had been wandering, indeed, in the leafless shrubbery an hour in the morning; but since dinner (Mrs. Reed, when there was no company, dined early) the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further outdoor exercise was now out of the question. I was glad of it: I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and \toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed. The said Eliza, John, and Georgiana were now clustered round their mama in the drawing-room: she lay reclined on a sofa by the fireside, and with her darlings about her (for the time neither quarrelling nor crying) looked perfectly happy. Me, she had dispensed from joining the group; saying, "She regretted to be under the necessity of keeping me at a distance; but that until she heard from Bessie, and could discover by her own observation, that I was endeavouring in good earnest to acquire a more sociable and childlike disposition, a more attractive and sprightly manner- something lighter, franker, more natural, as it were- she really must exclude me from privileges intended only for contented, happy, little children.'

'What does Bessie say I have done?' I asked.

'Jane, I don't like cavillers or questioners; besides, there is something truly forbidding in a child taking up her elders in that manner. Be seated somewhere; and until you can speak pleasantly, remain silent.'
 
A small breakfast-room adjoined the drawing-room, I slipped in there. It contained a bookcase: I soon possessed myself of a volume, taking care that it should be one stored with pictures. I mounted into the window-seat: gathering up my feet, I sat cross-legged, like a Turk; and, having drawn the red moreen curtain nearly close, I was shrined in double retirement. Folds of scarlet drapery shut in my view to the right hand; to the left were the clear panes of glass, protecting, but not separating me from the drear November day. At intervals, while turning over the leaves of my book, I studied the aspect of that winter afternoon. Afar, it offered a pale blank of mist and cloud; near a scene of wet lawn and storm-beat shrub, with ceaseless rain sweeping away wildly before a long and lamentable blast. I returned to my book- Bewick's History of British Birds: the letterpress thereof I cared little for, generally speaking; and yet there were certain introductory pages that, child as I was, I could not pass quite as a blank. They were those which treat of the haunts of sea-fowl; of 'the solitary rocks and promontories' by them only inhabited; of the coast of Norway, studded with isles from its southern extremity, the Lindeness, or Naze, to the North Cape- 'Where the Northern Ocean, in vast whirls, Boils round the naked, melancholy isles   Of farthest Thule; and the Atlantic surge Pours in among the stormy Hebrides.'Nor could I pass unnoticed the suggestion of the bleak shores of Lapland, Siberia, Spitzbergen, Nova Zembla, Iceland, Greenland, with 'the vast sweep of the Arctic Zone, and those forlorn regions of dreary space,- that reservoir of frost and snow, where firm fields of ice, the accumulation of centuries of winters, glazed in Alpine heights above heights, surround the pole and concentre the multiplied rigours of extreme cold.' Of these death-white realms I formed an idea of my own: shadowy, like all the half-comprehended notions that float dim through children's brains, but strangely impressive. The words in these introductory pages connected themselves with the succeeding vignettes, and gave significance to the rock standing up alone in a sea of billow and spray; to the broken boat stranded on a desolate coast; to the cold and ghastly moon glancing through bars of cloud at a wreck just sinking.
I cannot tell what sentiment haunted the quite solitary churchyard, with its inscribed headstone; its gate, its two trees, its low horizon, girdled by a broken wall, and its newly-risen crescent, attesting the hour of eventide. The two ships becalmed on a torpid sea, I believed to be marine phantoms. The fiend pinning down the thief's pack behind him, I passed over quickly: it was an object of terror. So was the black horned thing seated aloof on a rock, surveying a distant crowd surrounding a gallows. Each picture told a story; mysterious often to my undeveloped understanding and imperfect feelings, yet ever profoundly interesting: as interesting as the tales Bessie sometimes narrated on winter evenings, when she chanced to be in good humour; and when, having brought her ironing-table to the nursery hearth, she allowed us to sit about it, and while she got up Mrs. Reed's lace frills, and crimped her nightcap borders, fed our eager attention with passages of love and adventure taken from old fairy tales and other ballads; or (as at a later period I discovered) from the pages of Pamela, and Henry, Earl of Moreland. With Bewick on my knee, I was then happy: happy at least in my way. I feared nothing but interruption, and that came too soon. The breakfast-room door opened.

'Boh! Madam Mope!' cried the voice of John Reed; then he paused: he found the room apparently empty.

'Where the dickens is she!' he continued. 'Lizzy! Georgy! (calling to his sisters) Joan is not here: tell mama she is run out into the rain- bad animal!'

'It is well I drew the curtain,' thought I; and I wished fervently he might not discover my hiding-place: nor would John Reed have found it out himself; he was not quick either of vision or conception; but Eliza just put her head in at the door, and said at once-

'She is in the window-seat, to be sure, Jack.'

And I came out immediately, for I trembled at the idea of being dragged forth by the said Jack.

'What do you want?' I asked, with awkward diffidence.

'Say, "What do you want, Master Reed?"' was the answer. 'I want you to come here;' and seating himself in an armchair, he intimated by a gesture that I was to approach and stand before him.

John Reed was a schoolboy of fourteen years old; four years older than I, for I was but ten: large and stout for his age, with a dingy and unwholesome skin; thick lineaments in a spacious visage, heavy limbs and large extremities. He gorged himself habitually at table, which made him bilious, and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks. He ought now to have been at school; but his mama had taken him home for a month or two, 'on account of his delicate health.' Mr. Miles, the master, affirmed that he would do very well if he had fewer cakes and sweetmeats sent him from home; but the mother's heart turned from an opinion so harsh, and inclined rather to the more refined idea that John's sallowness was owing to over-application and, perhaps, to pining after home.

John had not much affection for his mother and sisters, and an antipathy to me. He bullied and punished me; not two or three times in the week, nor once or twice in the day, but continually: every nerve I had feared him, and every morsel of flesh in my bones shrank when he came near. There were moments when I was bewildered by the terror he inspired, because I had no appeal whatever against either his menaces or his inflictions; the servants did not like to offend their young master by taking my part against him, and Mrs. Reed was blind and deaf on the subject: she never saw him strike or heard him abuse me, though he did both now and then in her very presence, more frequently, however, behind her back.

Habitually obedient to John, I came up to his chair: he spent some three minutes in thrusting out his tongue at me as far as he could without damaging the roots: I knew he would soon strike, and while dreading the blow, I mused on the disgusting and ugly appearance of him who would presently deal it. I wonder if he read that notion in my face; for, all at once, without speaking, he struck suddenly and strongly. I tottered, and on regaining my equilibrium retired back a step or two from his chair.

'That is for your impudence in answering mama awhile since,' said he, 'and for your sneaking way of getting behind curtains, and for the look you had in your eyes two minutes since, you rat!'

Accustomed to John Reed's abuse, I never had an idea of replying to it; my care was how to endure the blow which would certainly follow the insult.

'What were you doing behind the curtain?' he asked.

'I was reading.'

'Show the book.'

I returned to the window and fetched it thence.

'You have no business to take our books; you are a dependant, mama says; you have no money; your father left you none; you ought to beg, and not to live here with gentlemen's children like us, and eat the same meals we do, and wear clothes at our mama's expense. Now, I'll teach you to rummage my bookshelves: for they are mine; all the house belongs to me, or will do in a few years. Go and stand by the door, out of the way of the mirror and the windows.'

I did so, not at first aware what was his intention; but when I saw him lift and poise the book and stand in act to hurl it, I instinctively started aside with a cry of alarm: not soon enough, however; the volume was flung, it hit me, and I fell, striking my head against the door and cutting it. The cut bled, the pain was sharp: my terror had passed its climax; other feelings succeeded.

'Wicked and cruel boy!' I said. 'You are like a murderer- you are like a slave-driver- you are like the Roman emperors!'

I had read Goldsmith's History of Rome, and had formed my opinion of Nero, Caligula, etc. Also I had drawn parallels in silence, which I never thought thus to have declared aloud.

'What! what!' he cried. 'Did she say that to me? Did you hear her, Eliza and Georgiana? Won't I tell mama? but first-' He ran headlong at me: I felt him grasp my hair and my shoulder: he had closed with a desperate thing. I really saw in him a tyrant, a murderer. I felt a drop or two of blood from my head trickle down my neck, and was sensible of somewhat pungent suffering: these sensations for the time predominated over fear, and I received him in frantic sort. I don't very well know what I did with my hands, but he called me 'Rat! Rat!' and bellowed out aloud. Aid was near him: Eliza and Georgiana had run for Mrs. Reed, who was gone upstairs: she now came upon the scene, followed by Bessie and her maid Abbot. We were parted: I heard the words-

'Dear! dear! What a fury to fly at Master John!'

'Did ever anybody see such a picture of passion!'

Then Mrs. Reed subjoined-

'Take her away to the red-room, and lock her in there.' Four hands were immediately laid upon me, and I was borne upstairs.
 
 

第一章 
 
那天,出去散步是不可能了。其实,早上我们还在光秃秃的灌木林中溜达了一个小时,但从午饭时起(无客造访时,里德太太很早就用午饭)便刮起了冬日凛冽的寒风,随后阴云密布,大雨滂沱,室外的活动也就只能作罢了。

我倒是求之不得。我向来不喜欢远距离散步,尤其在冷飕飕的下午。试想,阴冷的薄暮时分回得家来,手脚都冻僵了,还要受到保姆贝茵的数落,又自觉体格不如伊丽莎、约翰和乔治亚娜,心里既难过又惭愧,那情形委实可怕。

此时此刻,刚才提到的伊丽莎、约翰和乔治亚娜都在客厅里,簇拥着他们的妈妈。她则斜倚在炉边的沙发上,身旁坐着自己的小宝贝们(眼下既未争吵也未哭叫),一副安享天伦之乐的神态。而我呢,她恩准我不必同他们坐在一起了,说是她很遗憾,不得不让我独个儿在一旁呆着。要是没有亲耳从贝茜那儿听到,并且亲眼看到,我确实在尽力养成一种比较单纯随和的习性,活泼可爱的举止,也就是更开朗、更率直、更自然些,那她当真不让我享受那些只配给予快乐知足的孩子们的特权了。

“贝茵说我干了什么啦?”我问。

“简,我不喜欢吹毛求疵或者刨根究底的人,更何况小孩子家这么跟大人顶嘴实在让人讨厌。找个地方去坐着,不会和气说话就别张嘴。”

客厅的隔壁是一间小小的餐室,我溜了进去。里面有一个书架。不一会儿,我从上面拿下一本书来,特意挑插图多的,爬上窗台,缩起双脚,像土耳其人那样盘腿坐下,将红色的波纹窗帘几乎完全拉拢,把自己加倍隐蔽了起来。

在我右侧,绯红色窗幔的皱褶档住了我的视线;左侧,明亮的玻璃窗庇护着我,使我既免受十一月阴沉天气的侵害,又不与外面的世界隔绝,在翻书的间隙,我抬头细看冬日下午的景色。只见远方白茫茫一片云雾,近处湿漉漉一块草地和受风雨袭击的灌木。一阵持久而凄厉的狂风,驱赶着如注的暴雨,横空归过。

我重又低头看书,那是本比尤伊克的《英国鸟类史》。文字部份我一般不感兴趣,但有几页导言,虽说我是孩子,却不愿当作空页随手翻过。内中写到了海鸟生息之地;写到了只有海鸟栖居的“孤零零的岩石和海岬”;写到了自南端林纳斯尼斯,或纳斯,至北角都遍布小岛的挪威海岸:

那里,北冰洋掀起的巨大漩涡,咆哮在极地光秃凄凉约小岛四周。而大西洋的汹涌波涛,泻入了狂暴的赫布里底群岛。

还有些地方我也不能看都不看,一翻而过,那就是书中提到的拉普兰、西伯利亚、斯匹次卑尔根群岛、新地岛、冰岛和格陵兰荒凉的海岸。“广袤无垠的北极地带和那些阴凄凄的不毛之地,宛若冰雪的储存库。千万个寒冬所积聚成的坚冰,像阿尔卑斯山的层层高峰,光滑晶莹,包围着地极,把与日俱增的严寒汇集于一处。”我对这些死白色的地域,已有一定之见,但一时难以捉摸,仿佛孩子们某些似懂非懂的念头,朦朦胧胧浮现在脑际,却出奇地生动,导言中的这几页文字,与后面的插图相配,使兀立于大海波涛中的孤岩,搁浅在荒凉海岸上的破船,以及透过云带俯视着沉船的幽幽月光,更加含义隽永了。

我说不清一种什么样的情调弥漫在孤寂的墓地:刻有铭文的墓碑、一扇大门、两棵树、低低的地平线、破败的围墙。一弯初升的新月,表明时候正是黄昏。

两艘轮船停泊在水波不兴的海面上,我以为它们是海上的鬼怪。

魔鬼从身后按住窃贼的背包,那模样实在可怕,我赶紧翻了过去。

一样可怕的是,那个头上长角的黑色怪物,独踞于岩石之上,远眺着一大群人围着绞架。

每幅画都是一个故事、由于我理解力不足,欣赏水平有限,它们往往显得神秘莫测,但无不趣味盎然,就像某些冬夜,贝茜碰巧心情不错时讲述的故事一样。遇到这种时候,贝茵会把烫衣桌搬到保育室的壁炉旁边,让我们围着它坐好。她一面熨里德太太的网眼饰边,把睡帽的边沿烫出褶裥来,一面让我们迫不及待地倾听她一段段爱情和冒险故事,这些片段取自于古老的神话传说和更古老的歌谣,或者如我后来所发现,来自《帕美拉》和《莫兰伯爵亨利》。

当时,我膝头摊着比尤伊克的书,心里乐滋滋的,至少是自得其乐,就怕别人来打扰。但打扰来得很快,餐室的门开了。

“嘘!苦恼小姐!”约翰.里德叫唤着,随后又打住了,显然发觉房间里空无一人。

“见鬼,上哪儿去了呀?”他接着说。“丽茜!乔琪!”(喊着他的姐妹)“琼不在这儿呐,告诉妈妈她窜到雨地里去了,这个坏畜牲!”

“幸亏我拉好了窗帘,”我想。我真希望他发现不了我的藏身之地。约翰.里德自己是发现不了的,他眼睛不尖,头脑不灵??上б晾錾用磐庖惶浇防?,就说:

“她在窗台上,准没错,杰克。”

我立即走了出来,因为一想到要被这个杰克硬拖出去,身子便直打哆嗦。

什么事呀?”我问,既尴尬又不安。

“该说,什么事呀,里德‘少爷?’”便是我得到的回答。“我要你到这里来,”他在扶手椅上坐下,打了个手势,示意我走过去站到他面前。

约翰.里德是个十四岁的小学生,比我大四岁,因为我才十岁。论年龄,他长得又大又胖,但肤色灰暗,一付病态。脸盘阔,五官粗,四肢肥,手膨大?;瓜不侗┮┦?,落得个肝火很旺,目光迟钝,两颊松弛。这阵子,他本该呆在学校里,可是他妈把他领了回来,住上—、两个月,说是因为“身体虚弱”。但他老师迈尔斯先生却断言,要是家里少送些糕点糖果去,他会什么都很好的,做母亲的心里却讨厌这么刻薄的话,而倾向于一种更随和的想法,认为约翰是过于用功,或许还因为想家,才弄得那么面色蜡黄的。

约翰对母亲和姐妹们没有多少感情,而对我则很厌恶。他欺侮我,虐待我,不是一周三两次,也不是一天一两回,而是经常如此。弄得我每根神经都怕他,他一走运,我身子骨上的每块肌肉都会收缩起来。有时我会被他吓得手足无措,因为面对他的恐吓和欺侮,我无处哭诉。佣人们不愿站在我一边去得罪他们的少爷,而里德太太则装聋作哑,儿子打我骂我,她熟视无睹,尽管他动不动当着她的面这样做,而背着她的时候不用说就更多了。

我对约翰已惯于逆来顺受,因此便走到他椅子跟前。他费了大约三分钟,拼命向我伸出
舌头,就差没有绷断舌根。我明白他会马上下手,一面担心挨打,一面凝视着这个就要动手
的人那付令人厌恶的丑态。我不知道他看出了我的心思没有,反正他二话没说,猛然间狠命
揍我。我一个踉跄,从他椅子前倒退了一两步才站稳身子。

“这是对你的教训,谁叫你刚才那么无礼跟妈妈顶嘴,”他说,“谁叫你鬼鬼祟祟躲到窗帘后面,谁叫你两分钟之前眼光里露出那付鬼样子,你这耗子!”

我已经习惯于约翰.里德的谩骂,从来不愿去理睬,一心只想着加何去忍受辱骂以后必然接踪而来的殴打。

“你躲在窗帘后面干什么?”他问。

“在看书。”

“把书拿来。”

我走回窗前把书取来。

“你没有资格动我们的书。妈妈说的,你靠别人养活你,你没有钱,你爸爸什么也没留给你,你应当去讨饭,而不该同像我们这样体面人家的孩子一起过日子,不该同我们吃一样的饭,穿妈妈掏钱给买的衣服。现在我要教训你,让你知道翻我们书架的好处。这些书都是我的,连整座房子都是,要不过几年就归我了。滚,站到门边去,离镜子和窗子远些。”

我照他的话做了,起初并不知道他的用意。但是他把书举起,拿稳当了,立起身来摆出要扔过来的架势时,我一声惊叫,本能地往旁边一闪,可是晚了、那本书己经扔过来,正好打中了我,我应声倒下,脑袋撞在门上,碰出了血来,疼痛难忍。我的恐惧心理已经越过了极限,被其他情感所代替。

“你是个恶毒残暴的孩子!”我说。“你像个杀人犯——你是个奴隶监工——你像罗马皇帝!”

我读过哥尔斯密的《罗马史》,时尼禄、卡利古拉等人物已有自己的看法,并暗暗作过类比,但决没有想到会如此大声地说出口来。

“什么!什么!”他大叫大嚷。“那是她说的吗?伊丽莎、乔治亚娜,你们可听见她说了?我会不去告诉妈妈吗?不过我得先——”

他向我直冲过来,我只觉得他抓住了我的头发和肩膀,他跟一个拼老命的家伙扭打在一起了。我发现他真是个暴君,是个杀人犯。我觉得一两滴血从头上顺着脖子淌下来,感到一阵热辣辣的剧痛。这些感觉一时占了上风,我不再畏惧,而发疯似地同他对打起来。我不太清楚自己的双手到底干了什么,只听得他骂我“耗子!耗子!”一面杀猪似地嚎叫着。他的帮手近在咫尺,伊丽莎和乔治亚娜早已跑出去讨救兵,里德太太上了楼梯,来到现场,后面跟随着贝茜和女佣艾博特。她们我们拉开了,我只听见她们说:

“哎呀!哎呀!这么大的气出在约翰少爷身上:”

“谁见过那么火冒三丈的!”

随后里德太太补充说:

“带她到红房子里去,关起来。”于是马上就有两双手按住了我,把我推上楼去。
 

词汇解析:

1、shrubbery [ '?r?b?ri ] n. 灌木;灌木林

例句:The voice seemed to be coming from the shrubbery.

声音似乎是从灌木丛里传来的。

 

2、penetrating [ 'penitreiti? ]  adj. 尖锐的;有洞察力的;渗透的 v. 穿透;贯穿(penetrateing形式)

 例句:The professor gave us a penetrating analysis of the play.

教授给作了一次深刻的剧本分析。

 

penetrating rain 一场细密的、可以淋透一切的大雨

 

3、out of the question  不可能的

 

例句:We can't go out in this weather; it's out of the question.
这种天气我们不能出去。那是不可能的。

 

out of question毫无疑问 没问题

 

例句:It's out of question that you borrow my car.

你要借我的汽车,那是没有问题的。

 

4、chide   [t?aid] vi. 斥责,指责 vt. (温和地)责备

           例句:He chided his son for being clumsy.

                  他斥责儿子笨手笨脚。

 

5、nurse [ n?:s ]   n. 护士;奶妈,保姆

6、inferiority [ in,fi?ri'?r?ti ] n. 次等;自卑;下部;下属

           例句:He wrestled all his life with his feeling of inferiority.

他终生都在与他的自卑感作斗争。

 

7、endeavour [ in'dev? ] n. 尽力,竭力 vt. 竭力做到,试图或力图vi. 竭力;企图

 

例句:We must endeavour to fill in the blanks in our industrial development.

我们必须努力填补我国工业发展上的空白。

 

8、caviller n. 吹毛求疵者

9、at intervals  时时,不时;相隔一定距离(或时间)

 

例句:It snowed at intervals this week.

这星期不时地下雪。

10、attest   [?'test] v. 证明,作证,为 ... 作证

 

例句 No one can attest to the absolute truth of his statement.

没有人可以证明他的话是绝对正确的。

11、stout   [staut]  adj. 强壮的,稳重的,肥胖的

 

例句: He became stout as he grew older.

                     随着年龄的增长,他发胖了。

 

12、predominate [ pri'd?mineit ]  vt. 支配,主宰;在中占优势 vi. 占主导(或支配)地位

 

例句:So we can predominate the trends of epidemic situation better than before.

从而更好地掌握未来疫情动态发展趋势。

  

1、 Folds of scarlet drapery shut in my view to the right hand; to the left were the clear panes of glass

(在我右侧,绯红色窗幔的皱褶档住了我的视线;左侧,明亮的玻璃窗庇护着我。)

 

    将表示地点的介词短语放在句首进行强调时,使用全部倒装。谓语动词常为不及物动词。

例句:From the window came the sound of music.

 

2、 child as I was, I could not pass quite as a blank

(虽说我是孩子,却不愿当作空页随手翻过。)

 

 

    这是让步状语从句的倒装句,从属连词as用于特殊次序,表示尽管。结构是名词、形容词、副词+as。记住名词前无任何冠词!

例句:Cold as it was,we went out.

      Child as she is, she knows a great deal.

 

 

3、 'Where the dickens is she! 见鬼,上哪儿去了呀?

内容来自 听力课堂网:http://www.viz2016.com/show-6582-105999-1.html
用手机学英语,请加听力课堂微信公众号:tingclass123
用户搜索

疯狂英语 英语语法 新概念英语 走遍美国 四级听力 英语音标 英语入门 发音 美语 四级 新东方 七年级 赖世雄 zero是什么意思

<object id="fJSPHBF"><wbr id="fJSPHBF"></wbr></object>
<acronym id="fJSPHBF"><center id="fJSPHBF"></center></acronym>
<object id="fJSPHBF"></object>
<object id="fJSPHBF"><wbr id="fJSPHBF"></wbr></object><object id="fJSPHBF"></object>
<object id="fJSPHBF"></object>
<acronym id="fJSPHBF"><center id="fJSPHBF"></center></acronym>
<sup id="fJSPHBF"><center id="fJSPHBF"></center></sup>
<object id="fJSPHBF"></object>
  • 6967931506 2018-01-23
  • 8427511505 2018-01-23
  • 1785311504 2018-01-23
  • 413761503 2018-01-22
  • 247881502 2018-01-21
  • 5045891501 2018-01-21
  • 313631500 2018-01-21
  • 2076671499 2018-01-20
  • 635781498 2018-01-19
  • 6781391497 2018-01-19
  • 2547851496 2018-01-19
  • 6645161495 2018-01-18
  • 6668371494 2018-01-18
  • 2778821493 2018-01-18
  • 9739831492 2018-01-17
  • 5983621491 2018-01-17
  • 8471911490 2018-01-16
  • 1388891489 2018-01-16
  • 4662891488 2018-01-15
  • 836291487 2018-01-15